Curriculum writing is an art which is crucial when it comes to starting a new program, understanding the curriculum with its standard requirements according to industry standard are the key points to writing a successful curriculum.

 

Learning the key components of curriculum development is crucial when structuring a curriculum.

 

As new technologies develop, staying current with emerging technologies can be a plus.

 

Knowing the structure:

 

Divide the curriculum educational objectives into three "domains":

  • DOMAIN I: Cognitive Domain Includes:

    Knowledge

    Exhibit memory of learned materials by recalling facts, terms, basic concepts and answers

     

    Comprehension

    Demonstrate understanding of facts and ideas by organizing, comparing, translating, interpreting, giving descriptions, and stating the main ideas

     

    Application

    Using new knowledge. Solve problems in new situations by applying acquired knowledge, facts, techniques and rules in a different way

     

    Analysis

    Examine and break information into parts by identifying motives or causes. Make inferences and find evidence to support generalizations

     

    Synthesis

    Compile information together in a different way by combining elements in a new pattern or proposing alternative solutions

     

    Evaluation

    Present and defend opinions by making judgments about information, validity of ideas or quality of work based on a set of criteria

  • DOMAIN II: Affective Domain Includes

    Receiving

    The lowest level; the student passively pays attention. Without this level no learning can occur. Receiving is about the student's memory and recognition as well.

     

    Responding

    The student actively participates in the learning process, not only attends to a stimulus; the student also reacts in some way.

     

    Valuing

    The student attaches a value to an object, phenomenon, or piece of information. The student associates a value or some values to the knowledge he acquired.

     

    Organizing

    The student can put together different values, information, and ideas and accommodate them within his/her own schema; comparing, relating and elaborating on what has been learned.

     

    Characterizing

    The student holds a particular value or belief that now exerts influence on his/her behavior so that it becomes a characteristic.

  • DOMAIN III: Psychomotor Domain Includes

    Perception

    The ability to use sensory cues to guide motor activity. This ranges from sensory stimulation, through cue selection, to translation.

     

    Set

    Readiness to act. It includes mental, physical, and emotional sets. These three sets are dispositions that predetermine a person's response to different situations.

     

    Guided Response

    The early stages in learning a complex skill that includes imitation and trial and error. Adequacy of performance is achieved by practicing.

     

    Mechanism

    This is the intermediate stage in learning a complex skill. Learned responses have become habitual and the movements can be performed with some confidence and proficiency.

     

    Complex Overt Response

    The skillful performance of motor acts that involve complex movement patterns. Proficiency is indicated by a quick, accurate, and highly coordinated performance, requiring a minimum of energy.

     

    Adaptation

    Skills are well developed and the individual can modify movement patterns to fit special requirements.

     

    Origination

    Creating new movement patterns to fit a particular situation or specific problem. Learning outcomes emphasize creativity based upon highly developed skills.

CURRICULUM OR SYLLABUS DEVELOPMENT : AN OVERVIEW

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